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ALICIA KUNKEL

Cold War Unit Plan
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Cold War Unit Plan                                                               Alicia Kunkel

 

Minnesota Social Studies Standard:

I. US History   N.  Post War United States, 1945-1972.

The students will understand the Cold War, its consequences and its conflicts.

1.                  Students will demonstrate knowledge of key events of the Cold War and the causes and consequences of the Korean War.

2.                  Students will analyze America’s involvement in the Vietnam War.

 

Guiding Question:

What role does fear play in Foreign Policy?

 

The students will:

1.                  Demonstrate knowledge of key events of the Cold War and the causes and consequences of the Korean War.

2.                  Analyze America’s involvement in the Vietnam War.

3.                  Analyze what role fear does play in foreign policy in the Post War Era.

4.                  Explain the changes that led to the end of the Cold War.

 

Evaluation.  The students will:

1.                  Complete a test on (multiple choice, short answer and essay) on the start of the Cold War, the military conflicts, causes, consequences and what caused the Soviet Union to fall.

2.                  Keep a historic journal on their ideas, comments and reactions to the various activities during the unit.

3.                  Partake in a mock trial for Alger Hiss.  The students will be split in half, prosecution and defendant.

 

 

Day to Day Outline:

Day 1

Students will:

1.      Understand the expectations of the Unit.

2.      Start thinking about the Cold War and what they already know and what they think they know.

Students will review the unit handout and the instructor will answer any questions that the students might have.

Students will fill out a KWL chart individually.  A group discussion will occur and as a result a class KWL chart will be produced.

 

Day 2

Students will:

1.                  Take brief notes and listen to a small lecture on the end of WWII and the beginning of the disagreements that started the Cold War.

2.                  Split into groups and read the primary sources handouts provided by the instructor.

3.                  Students will share their findings to the rest of the class.

Instructor will deliver a small lecture to provide background knowledge of the events that led up to the Cold War.  The students are expected to take thorough notes on the lecture.

The students will split into groups of 4.  Each group will be given a different primary source.  They will be instructed to read the handout individually and quietly and when finished they should discuss their finding within their group.  Each group will be instructed to explain the document to the rest of the class.

 

 

Day 3 and 4

Students will:

1.                  Begin to understand witness how fear can make people alter their life and their thinking by watching the documentary “Atomic Café”.

Students will watch the 88-minute movie.  The instructor will ask them to write for five minutes in their historical journals.

 

Day 5

Students will:

1.                  React to the film.

2.                  Explain how they think fear played a part in the clips that they saw in the film.

3.                  Develop an understanding of the terms conducive with anti-communism sentiment (red baiters, Red Scare, HUAC, McCarthyism, etc.)

The students will react to the film viewed the day before.  With the reaction of the film the instructor will ask the students to elaborate on how fear was portrayed within the film.

The instructor will perform a small lecture on key terms and concepts introduced by the film.

The instructor will introduce a take-home assignment in which the student is asked to locate a person who was alive in the 1950’s and ask them a series of questions that is provided by the instructor.

 

Day 6

Students will:

1.         Will read the transcripts from the Alger Hiss case and answer the questions at the end of the handout.

2.         Be split up in half and start preparing their arguments for the mock trial.

3.         Split up into groups and share their surveys that they have completed over the weekend.

4.         Write in their journals in response to the question “How does fear affect people lives?”

The instructor will handout copies of the Alger Hiss case and instruct the students to read it and complete the questions at the end of the reading.  The students will share their answers to the end of the reading questions to the rest of the class.

The students will start preparing their  closing argument for the mock trial of Alger Hiss in order to either prove that Mr. Hiss is innocent or guilty.

The students will split up into pairs and share their surveys.  The instructor will ask if was any resounding themes within the surveys and ask the students to identify them.  The instructor will write them on the board.

The students will write in their historical journals and answer the question, “how does fear affect peoples lives?”

 

Day 7

The students will:

1.         Continue to work on their closing arguments within their group.

2.         Present their closing argument to the rest of the class.

3.         Decide if they think Alger Hiss is actually innocent or guilty.

The students will return to their groups and finish their closing arguments.  Prosecution will present their 10-minute closing argument to the Defendants.  The Defendants will present their 10-minute closing argument to the rest of the class.

The students will vote if Alger Hiss was innocent or guilty.

 

Day 8

Students will:

1.         Watch a short clip of the “kitchen debate” and take notes on the commodity gap.

            2.         Students will take notes on the arms race and the space race.

The students will watch a short clip on the “kitchen debate”.  The instructor will provide a short lecture on what the commodity gap is.

The instructor will give a lecture on the space race and arms race and how the fear of falling behind drove the U.S. to develop more technologies.

 

Day 9

Students will:

            1.         Take notes during a lecture on the Korean Conflict.

a.         Understand the events that led up to the military intervention in Korea. 

            2.         Take notes during a lecture on the Cuban Missile Crisis

The instructor will provide a short lecture on the Korean War and the Cuban Missile Crisis.  The students will take notes on the lecture.    

 

Day 10

Students will:

1.         Split into groups and read the primary document provided on the Cuban Missile Crisis.

            2.         Students will teach the other groups about their primary document.

The instructor will split the class into groups of 4.  The instructor will assign each group a different primary document.  The students will read the document separately and then answer the, who, what, where, when and why this is important.

The students will present their document to the rest of the class and tell why they think that the document is important.

 

Day 11

Students will:

            1.         Take notes during a lecture on the Vietnam War.

            2.         Understand the events that led up to the Vietnam War.

            3.         Understand how fear played a role in the Vietnam War.

The instructor will give a lecture on the Vietnam War including the events that led up to the Vietnam War and how fear of communism played a role in the decision to go to war.

 

Day 12

Students will:

            1.         Watch the film “Vietnam- How we went to War”

            2.         Fill out worksheet during the film.

The students will watch the film “Vietnam- How we went to War” 50 minutes.  The students will fill out the worksheet accompanied by the film.

 

Day 13

Students will:

1.         React to the film viewed on the previous day in their historical journal. 

2.         Prepare questions for the Vietnam Veteran that will be visiting the class the next day.

The students will react to the video, “Vietnam—How we went to War”, in their historical journals.

The students will list questions that they want to ask the Veteran we he comes in.  The instructor will guide the students to insure appropriateness and professionalism.  They class will make a master list that the instructor will give the guest to look over and address during his talk.

 

Day 14

Students will:

            1.         Listen attentively to the guest.

            2.         Ask appropriate questions.

            3.         Give their opinions about the guest and the topics they talked about in their historical journal.

A guest will give a talk about their experiences in the Vietnam War.  How fear affected them in battle.

The students will listen attentively and ask appropriate questions.

The students will react the guest and give their own opinions about the guest in their historical journals.

 

Day 15

Students will:

            1.         Take the end of the unit exam consisting of multiple choice, short answer and essay. 

 

How are the Standards/ Benchmarks met?

            The unit addresses the beginning of the Cold War in the Day 1.  The unit goes onto address very important consequences, good and bad, that the Cold War had, such as the space race, arms race, commodity gap, and military conflicts.  The benchmarks ask that both the Korean Conflict and the Vietnam War would be addressed.  On Day 9, I cover the Korean Conflict and Days 11-14 cover the Vietnam War.

 

How the Demographics are met.

            With working in groups, the students that are ELL, below reading level and the one who has a learning disability, can benefit from help form the “A” honor roll students.  By choosing the groups myself, I can make sure that each student is placed in a group that will best benefit them and produce a learning community.  I can also give out typed notes to the ELL students so they can follow along easily. The student with the learning disability I would provide a packet of notes and other readings that would be expected to be completed in class to his special education teacher and send one home for his parents.  To assist the students that are reading below reading level, I will provide an outline of the notes that would just need to be filled in during the lecture. 

           

 

Spiral Curriculum

            The curriculum spirals around a theme of fear.  How did fear change people’s lives?  How did fear affect the decisions of the government?  The theme of fear is constantly being readdressed in almost every individual lesson.  In Day 1 I have the students watching the documentary “Atomic Café” that addresses the fear of the bomb and spies.  The Unit goes on to teach about red baiters and I prepared an activity dealing with the Alger Hiss case.  I also touch on the reoccurring theme of fear when discussing the different military conflicts and “race” to develop superior technology.

           

 

Multiple Choice Questions

1.         What led to the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War? (Choose the best answer)

            A.        They did not like countries declaring freedom.

            B.        The fear of spreading Communism in the world.

            C.        They did not like the French occupation in Vietnam.

 

2.         Did the fear of spreading communism affect the U.S. Foreign policy?

            A.        Yes, that is why they chose to go militarily into certain areas.

            B.        Yes, that is why the U.S. was closed during the years of the Cold War.

            C.        No, the U.S. did not fear that communism would spread.

            D.        No, they would have made the same military decisions even if there wasn’t a risk of spreading communism.

 

3.         Which situation led to the blockade of Cuba in 1962?

            A.        Cuban Missile Crisis

            B.        Bay of Pigs

            C.        Cuban Revolution

            D.        Castro signed a trading agreement with the Soviet Union

            E.        All of the Above

 

4.         What event led to the start of the Cold War?

            A.        Dropping of the bomb on Hiroshima

            B.        German invasion of Russia

            C.        Debate on what to do with Poland—the Poland question.

            D.        The Korean War.

 

5.         Order the following events in chronological order by earliest to latest. (Choose the best sequence)

            A.        Bay of Pigs, Korean War, Vietnam War, Kitchen Debate

            B.        Korean War, Kitchen Debate, Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam War

            C.        Kitchen Debate, Korean War, Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam War

            D.        Vietnam War, Cuban Missile Crisis, Kitchen Debate, Korean War.

 

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